2 Days in Prague


Of course, a 2 day or weekend in Prague is not enough to get to know everything the city has to offer. However, you can encompass a big part of the most interesting attractions. Our two-day itinerary is prepared especially for ‘Euro city breaks’ visitors and gives tips on what definitely not to miss when visiting Prague for a limited time.

Day One – from Prague Castle to Old Town Square

The most popular tourist route leads from Prague Castle through Lesser Town and Kampa to the river and continues to the Old Town Square towards the Prague Astronomical Clock. It partially copies the route of the one-day city tour and in this text we mention only the different sections of the route. For more information, especially about the start of the route, it is therefore advisable to check the one-day tour information.

Prague Castle, Lesser Town and Charles Bridge

Prague Castle is the main landmark of Prague. One of the largest castle complexes in the world is best transported by metro (Hradčanská station) or by tram (Prague Castle stop). From the Castle the route continues down the Nerudova Street to Lesser Town Square, where there is an important church – the Church of St. Nicholas.

From Malostranské Square, it is advisable to continue along Karmelitská Street in the direction of Újezd, turn left into Prokopská Street and proceed to Velkopřevorské Square. There is the Lennon Wall with graffiti, which is a popular place for photography. You can walk through the Čertovka Bridge to the Kampa Park, where the Werich Villa stands.  It is a house with a café named after the famous Czech actor who lived here. It is also possible to see the area of Sovovy Mlýny (Sova’s Mills), which currently serves as a museum of modern art. At the same time, there is a view of one of the most famous Czech landmarks – Charles Bridge, over which the journey continues.

Charles Bridge is an iconic place in the Czech Republic. The interesting fact is that still 50 years ago, the cars were allowed on the bridge. Today it is a pedestrian area with many tourists who can be avoided only late at night or very early in the morning. It is the oldest bridge over the Vltava River and contains 30 statues and sculptures, mainly in the Baroque style.

the Old Town Square and Astronomical Clock

From Charles Bridge, the journey continues through the streets of the Old Town to the Old Town Square. Here the Astronomical Clock with a march of 12 Apostles every hour. The square is also complemented with a monument to Master Jan Hus and several important houses and palaces.

From the Old Town Square it is possible to end the walk in Pařížská Street, where luxury brand shops are concentrated.  Those who prefer historical monuments can walk to the Ovocný Trh (Fruit Market) and further to the Powder Gate and the Municipal House.

Day Two – from Wenceslas Square to Petřín

The second day starts at Wenceslas Square (Muzeum and Můstek metro stations). This wide boulevard is dominated by the National Museum building and a giant equestrian statue of St. Wenceslas on horseback. It is also worth checking two passages Lucerna and Světozor. From the latter, one can walk to the neighbouring Franciscan Garden.

Dancing House

There is a public transport stop in the middle of Wenceslas Square, which can be used for transportation to Jirásek Square with one transit stop. There is a modern landmark of the city, the Dancing House. On the ground floor there is a gallery while on the top, a luxury bar with a terrace overlooking the Vltava River and Prague Castle. Alternatively, you can walk from Wenceslas Square to Jirásek Square through the historic centre. The distance is approximately 1.5 km and the route runs past many historic buildings.

From the Dancing House, you can go on along the embankment in the direction of the Vltava River to the Legion Bridge and the National Theatre. The theatre is one of the most important buildings in Bohemia, built in 1881 in the neo-Renaissance style.

Petřín Hill

Finally, we recommend visiting the Petřín Park, to which Vítězná Street leads from the National Theatre over the Legion Bridge. On the Petřín Hill, there stands the 65.5 meter high tower, which is surrounded by a large park with many overlooks and the nearby Mirror Maze. And the best part is that you can get to the top of the hill by cableway, which can be easily taken using regular public transport tickets.

At the very end, you can walk a path down the Petřín Park, ending in one of numerous, nice pubs or wine bars located in that area.