Lucerna Palace

The Lucerna Palace is the first arcade building in Prague and an important centre of cultural, business and social events. This multifunctional centre is located in the middle of Wenceslas Square in Vodičkova Street. It was built on the site of the former Bělský Palace and the adjacent house between 1907-1911 and designed by project architect Václav Havel and partially also by builder Josef Čamský. The complex houses the Lucerna Music Bar with a capacity of 800 people, which has been in operation for 22 years and regularly hosts popular music stars on its circular stage. Since 2000, 80’s & 90‘s video parties have been regularly taking place in the bar every Friday. The most famous part of the Lucerna Palace is the Great Hall, where balls and concerts are held. There is also the Lucerna Cinema, one of the oldest cinemas still in operation in the world. It also features a stylish café where premiers of Czech films take place. On the ground floor is another multifunctional space – the Lucerna Gallery, where exhibitions, chamber concerts, photo vernissages and other events take place. The building is decorated with a controversial adaptation of the statue of St Wenceslas on Wenceslas Square, featuring St Wenceslas riding an upside-down dead horse. The statue was created by artist David Černý.

USEFUL INFORMAITON FOR VISITORS

Address: Štěpánská 61, Praha 1
GPS coordinates: 50.0808906N, 14.4264072E

PUBLIC TRANSPORT CONNECTIONS

The closest public transport stops near the Lucerna Palace:

  • Václavské náměstí tram stop
  • Můstek metro station (Line A – green line)
  • Muzeum metro station (Line A – green line, Line C – red line)
  • Ve Smečkách bus stop

OPENING HOURS AND ADMISSION

The Lucerna Palace is freely accessible to the public. For information about particular institutions, programme and admission fees, visit the official website.

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT LUCERNA PALACE

Although there are many Art Nouveau elements in the Lucerna Palace, modern materials and methods, such as reinforced concrete, glass brick ceilings and big glass surfaces, were also used in its construction. Later, the building was extended and connected with the neighbouring house, thus creating a passage from Vodičkova Street to Štěpánská Street.

LUCERNA PALACE AND NEARBY HISTORICAL SIGHTS

When visiting the Lucerna Palace, there are plenty of other interesting sights nearby to explore, including Wenceslas Square, the National Museum, the Franciscan Garden, the Cold War Museum, the Church of Our Lady of the Snows, Charles Square, the New Town Hall, the Adria Palace, the Mozarteum, the New Town Brewery and many others.